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15 Years of Care for Caregivers
by
Dr. Jim Guy
on
August 11, 2015
| From the Office |

This Fall marks our 15th anniversary.  It's a wonderful opportunity to reflect on those we helped and those who made our work possible.

When we began prior to 9/11, we didn't know how important our services would become to aid workers and emergency responders around the world.  Here's how it happened.  An increase in the number and severity of humanitarian emergencies made us all more dependent on aid workers and first responders.  At the same time, their work grew more dangerous and demanding, making it harder for them to thrive and continue.  They needed our help to keep going.  So, more than 100 organizations working in nearly every country invited us to provide resilience training, management consulting, and trauma recovery counseling to their staff.  Thousands attended our workshops or talked with us remotely or in person.  Hundreds of thousands used our online resources to build and maintain their wellbeing.  We learned what aid workers and emergency responders needed to keep going, and we used every available means to get them the information and support necessary.  

Today we are widely regarded as a leader in the field, and we're called on to assist after every major humanitarian emergency regardless of location.  Our staff are considered experts in providing mental health services to aid workers and emergency responders, and they're regularly invited to present at international conferences and planning meetings.  The Headington Institute is known for providing the best services available, anywhere.

Of course, we've had many partners who made this all possible.  This includes our outstanding Board of Directors, knowledgable Business Advisory Committee, 200+ individual donors and 8 charitable foundations, and 20+ local professionals donating their time and services.  You are among this group.  We're deeply grateful for your help.  It enabled us to grow and change in response to increasing demand.  Together, we're making a difference.

I wonder what the next 15 years hold for us.  Some things are certain: humanitarian emergencies will continue to grow in number and severity; resilient aid workers and emergency responders will be more important than ever; we will need to innovate and stretch to provide the psychological support required to keep them going.  But, there are some challenges ahead that concern me.  Will our next round of strategic planning result in goals that will effectively position us to meet future needs?  Will our succession planning provide the best people to take the place of those on our team who will retire?  Will donations and professional fees keep pace with increasing costs?  How will we protect our team when they travel to increasingly dangerous places to help those needing it most?

As was the case during the first 15 years, the next 15 will require our combined efforts to do what must be done.  I'm counting on you.  Thanks for your interest, commitment, and support.  

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