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Trauma and Critical Incident Care Module Gets an Update!
photo by mike baird
by
Alicia Jones
on
February 28, 2014
| Trauma & Critical Incidents |

We're excited to re-introduce this module to our humanitarian audience. The Trauma and Critical Incident Care module has long been one of our most popular online courses. The module provides a good overview of common trauma reactions, both in the immediate aftermath of a critical incident and in the days and months following.

After a critical incident many people wonder if their reactions are normal. Some of the distress individuals encounter can be made worse by fears that they are going crazy or that something is wrong with them. We hope this module will help to normalize common reactions and provide some helpful suggestions for recovering.

In addition, we’ve updated the module with some fascinating neuroscience research explaining how the brain and body reacts to critical incidents and trauma. Individuals who have experienced the shock of an explosion, the fear of an illegal checkpoint, or even a deadening of their senses in spite of imminent threats – will easily recognize their experiences in this module and gain more insight into why this happens. We live in an exciting research era in which links between our brain, our physical health, our thoughts and our emotions are becoming increasingly apparent. We hope the updates in this module will explain some of these findings in relevant ways and underscore practical measures to support humanitarian health and resilience.

Note: At this time the updated module is only available in English. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and hope to update the translated versions in the future.

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